The Cleanest Line The Cleanest Line

“It was an experience I’ll never forget, and you don’t get a whole lot of those in your life.” Read More

https://blog.patagonia.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/lynch_j_0164_cc_WEB-1600x1200.jpg
Emma Sant kites over the silica sands of Whitsunday Island, just west of the Great Barrier Reef. Photo: Jarrah Lynch
Photo: Peter Mather

In the Land of the Wolverine

By Tom Glass   |   Jun 19, 2018 June 19, 2018

Thumping along a frozen river by snowmachine, I’m winding my way into the heart of the Brooks Range in Northern Alaska. Riding snowmachines is a surprisingly busy activity, weight constantly shifting, eyes staring hard into the flat light, and today my decadent wrapping of goose down and full-face helmet with… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Flyathlon

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jun 15, 2018 June 15, 2018

There are a lot of serious problems in this world, but the solutions don’t always have to be serious. Fly fisherman and trail runner Andrew Todd channeled his concern for Colorado’s native trout and the watersheds that support them into the creation of a joyful, irreverent event: The Flyathlon. The… Read More

Photo: Wendy Savage

Celebrate Wool Times …

By Patagonia   |   Jun 14, 2018 June 14, 2018

In 2015, we made the conscious decision to put a pause on our wool sourcing “until we can assure our customers of a verifiable process that ensures the humane treatment of animals.” We are happy to have accomplished our goal and to update you that as of… Read More

Filleting the catch of the day. Photo: Dave McCoy

The Freedom to Live Off the Land

By Mike Wood   |   Jun 7, 2018 June 7, 2018

When I was a kid, the Connecticut River was my Yukon. I spent many days working alongside the river or canoeing its islands and backwaters in search of crabs, snapper, blues, ducks and alewives—amazing silvery fish that brave the depths of the Atlantic to feed and grow and then return… Read More

@patagonia

Dispatches from the Edge of the World

By Meaghen Brown   |   Jun 5, 2018 June 5, 2018

The wind at the edge of the world comes in clean and cold. Without any significant landmass to temper its force, it rips across the 40th latitude and slams into the prefab houses that straddle the tiny seaside township of Arthur River where we’re staying. It strains against the windows… Read More

Photo: Chris Brown

Baggies Shorts Throughout the Years

By Patagonia   |   Jun 1, 2018 June 1, 2018

In the book Unexpected: 30 Years of Patagonia Catalog Photography, long-time contributor and friend to many of us at Patagonia, John Russell, said in an interview, “For me, photography is all about two things, light and relationships.” Beautiful lighting is something you’ll find in any good photo. Read More

Emptying rocks from the shoes atop Mt. Russell, with a view a Mt. Whitney. Photo: Erik Schulte

California 14er-fest

By Erik Schulte   |   May 30, 2018 May 30, 2018

Groggily I stirred in the sweaty musk of my sleeping bag. I’d spent the night on the hard concrete slab directly outside the Independence campground’s pit toilets, with the wafting stench of shit enveloping my fitful slumber. I shut my eyes, trying to forget where I was. My hips were… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Venture Out

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   May 25, 2018 May 25, 2018

“I was working this corporate job, and, every day, I looked out the window and thought, ‘Man, those mountains are so beautiful, I wish I was out there,’” remembers Perry Cohen. Growing up, Perry was an outdoorsy kid—hiking and cross-country skiing in rural New Hampshire. He was thrilled when, as… Read More

Professional orienteer and wilderness advocate Hanny Allston runs near one of the entry points to the takayna / Tarkine region. Photo: Mikey Schaefer

The Way There: Why We Create and Seek Out Trails

By Meaghen Brown   |   May 24, 2018 May 24, 2018

It starts with the focal beam of a headlamp. Sunrise is more than an hour away and it’s pouring rain. Hands tucked into the sleeves of a jacket, and the pace already quick through the sharp Tasmanian buttongrass—trying to stay warm. There is an urgency to understand this threatened place,… Read More

If you love something, set it free. Eliza Kerr watches daughter Calliope (13) as she lowers herself out and begins to jug the infamous Nipple Pitch during the first known mother-daughter ascent of the Zodiac, El Capitan. Yosemite National Park, California. Photo: Eliza Kerr

Letter from a Mother to Her Village

By Eliza Kerr   |   May 11, 2018 May 11, 2018

May 14, 2017, Mother’s Day. Dear friends, yesterday I topped out on the Zodiac on El Capitan. Some of you have loyally and patiently supported me for almost six months while I prepared for and fretted about this adventure. Some of you have no idea what the Zodiac is. No… Read More

Photo: Ken Etzel

Alex Megos Sends Perfecto Mundo

By Patagonia   |   May 10, 2018 May 10, 2018

Yesterday, Alex Megos sent one of the most difficult routes in the world, completing the first ascent of Perfecto Mundo (5.15c or 9b+) at the limestone crag of Margalef in Catalunya, Spain. He called it the first hard route of his life. It marked not an apex,… Read More

LOADING
ERROR